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After two decades of international meetings on climate change have failed to reach consensus, the environmental world is beginning to sense a change in direction. The impacts of climate change no longer are being projected, they are being observed and measured, especially by those with the most to lose: corporations, cities and states.
The prevalence of pesticides may seem like something of a bygone era, one marked by Silent Spring and the Bhopal Disaster, but the grim reality is that they are unfortunately very much around. Whether it is BPA in your water bottle or neonicotinoids decimating bee populations, action has not been uniform.
At the United Nations Climate Summit on Tuesday in New York, President Obama issued a strong challenge to the Beijing leadership. China and the US “have a special responsibility to lead” on climate change, he said. “It’s what big nations have to do.” Obama said he had talked directly with Chinese Vice Premier Zhang Gaoli at the summit (President Xi Jinping did not attend) and urged the two countries to work together to cut global greenhouse gas emissions.
With a September 22 Op-Ed in the New York Times, YCELP Faculty Director Dan Esty proposes a new framework for "sealing the deal" on climate policy.
Minister of Oil and State Minister for National Assembly Affairs Dr. Ali Al-Omair on Monday commended the significant improvement Kuwait had achieved on the 2014 Environmental Performance Index (EPI), moving up from rank 126 to 42, among total 178 countries.
News broke Wednesday that the Obama administration may propose a “politically binding” climate agreement at upcoming United Nations talks that would bypass the U.S. Senate, where the climate accord negotiated in Kyoto in 1997 famously went to die. The outcry among conservative members of Congress was immediate. House science committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-TX) called it evidence that Obama “is willing to ignore the rule of law to get what he wants."
According to fellow columnist Nuray Mert, “millet,” a word used a lot by President-elect Recep Tayyip Erdo?an, could mean “people.” That would make Turkey a People’s Republic like China. Since I recently spent two weeks there, I can tell you that the two countries are actually quite similar.
According to the Environment Performance Index (EPI) Yale University, Sri Lanka ranked as 69th place in EPI which is a Global Environmental Assessment Index in terms of air quality management in the country. In South Asia, Sri Lanka is the best in air quality management according to the above assessment. Properly operating vehicle emission testing program and industrial emission control system are the key air quality management tools utilized for successes.
At Scientific American, Angel Hsu & William Miao argue that despite the release of new soil pollution data in December and a subsequent report in March, details about the state of China’s soil are little clearer than when earlier findings were labeled state secrets.
On March 17, the Chinese Ministry of Environmental Protection and the Ministry of Land and Resources released the first-ever results of a nationwide soil pollution survey that took place from 2005 to 2013. International media have commended the release, which revealed startling statistics such as one-fifth of arable land is polluted and contaminated with inorganic chemicals like cadmium, nickel and arsenic. On the surface, it seems, soil pollution, which was once a “state secret,” is no longer.



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